Psychology (PSY)

PSY 104A  General Psychology I - Discovery Program  (4 credits)  
PSY 110P  Introduction to Psychology I  (3 credits)  

Learning Community: This Learning Community will introduce students to a holistic wellness approach to health. The HW course component will identify major health problems in the United States. Students will have the opportunity to have a computerized fitness evaluation test done and objectives to improve or maintain their fitness condition. The teaching strategy is designed to provide an active learning situation for the student. The PSY course component will serve as an introduction to the science and profession of psychology, including coverage of human development, personality, social psychology, motivation, perception, and related topics. (Students may have the opportunity to participate in Psychology Department research projects)

PSY 111  Introduction to Psychology II  (3 credits)  

An introduction to the science and profession of psychology including coverage of research, human development, personality, testing and assessment, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychopathology, health and wellness, social cognition, and social influence. Note: This 3-credit course is open to students at Beth Israel Hospital only.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.
PSY 111CH  Introduction to Psychology II (CAP) - Learning Community  (3 credits)  

This Learning Community will integrate the study of Psychology with critical reading and writing. Analysis of texts representing current issues in the field will serve as a stimulus for discussion, research and enhancement of academic writing skills.

PSY 111CV  Intro. to Psychlgy II (CAP) - Wonderwomen & Supermen:Sex, Gndr, Health & Behavior Learning Community  (3 credits)  

Health and behavior are complex and familiar parts of human experience. There are many differences, and many similarities, in men's and women's health behavior. In this learning community we will examine basic principles of psychology with a focus on the role that being male or female has in has in health behaviors such as in diet, exercise, social relationships and staying healthy.

PSY 111M  Introduction to Psychology - Learning Community  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the most influential ideas regarding what it means to be human that have emerged from the traditions of religion, psychology, and philosophy.

PSY 112  Introduction to Psychology  (4 credits)  

This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall and Spring.
PSY 112C  Introduction to Psychology (CAP)  (4 credits)  

This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall and Spring.
PSY 196  Topics in Psychology  (3-4 credits)  
PSY 201  Psychology of Business and Industry  (3-4 credits)  

The psychological principles and techniques involved in the management of personnel in business and industry. The topics included are hiring techniques, job analysis, training performance appraisal, communications, fatigue, safety, morale and industrial leadership.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall.
PSY 202  Psychology of Violence  (3 credits)  

This course examines the psychology of violence from a global and public health and public policy perspective. Online discussions, lectures/outlines, power points, film, web-based materials, and readings address interpersonal, self-directed, and collective acts of violence that threaten human psychological/physical health and wellbeing. Global and public perspectives emphasize the scope of the problem, the physical and psychosocial impact of violence, and prevention/intervention efforts. Public policy issues relate to the translation, dissemination, and diffusion of research innovation.

Course Rotation: : Summer
PSY 203  Psychology of Expressive Therapies: Healing Through Art, Music, Drama, Poetry and Dance  (3 credits)  

This is an introductory course on the history, theory, and practice of expressive art therapies. Students will be introduced to art, music, dance, and drama therapies, through lecture/discussion, and firsthand experience. Students will be required to dance, sing, make art, make drama, and write poetry even though you may not consider yourself an artist, as singer, a dancer, musician, or poet. You will learn though your experiences of the creative arts therapy forms. Students will explore and work with a variety of materials and media and present their creative work to the class. NY:PLV;Fall

PSY 204  Introduction to Industrial and Organizational Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course will introduce and provide an overview of the field of Industrial and Organizational (I/O) Psychology. I/O Psychology, rooted in empirical research, studies the psychological aspects of work and the workplace and addresses the psychological and behavioral consequences, including productivity, in organizational setting and cultures. While this course will focus on the empirical research findings that form the foundations of the I/O Psychology field, the practical and applied implications for employees, leaders and their organizations will be the basis of class work and discussions.

Course Rotation: Fall
PSY 205  Statistics in Psychology and Allied Fields  (4 credits)  

An introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to psychological and educational research. Topics included are measures of central tendency and variability, standard scores, elementary probability theory, small sample theory, linear regression and correlation, non-parametric techniques, and introduction to analysis of variance and factor analysis.

Course Rotation: Spring.
PSY 206  Psychology and Law  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the application of social science research methods and psychological knowledge to contemporary issues within our legal system. Course topics and discussion will include: the structure of the US legal system, the psychology of crime, investigation and evaluation of criminal suspects, court procedures and trial process, forensic assessment, jury selection and decision making, and the psychology of victims and theories of punishment. The course will focus on the intersection between psychology and law, as well as explore important cases involving the influence of psychology within the legal system.

Course Rotation: Fall:Spring;NY:PLV
PSY 207  Intersectional Critical Liberation Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course will explore intersectional, critical, and liberation perspectives in psychology, including what these perspectives can contribute to a range of different psychology sub-disciplines, social identities, specific applied topics, and research methods. These perspectives focus on experiences of oppression, resistance to oppression, and the link between individual's unique psychological experiences and broader societal structures. Therefore, this course will focus on how psychology is related to struggles for social justice and equity.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall
PSY 208  Culture and Emotion in Health Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course introduces undergraduate students to theory and research in health psychology, with a focus on cultural differences and emotion in health and illness. Students will learn about common medical disorders and health concerns and their impact on psychosocial functioning; the influence of individual and cultural differences in emotion regulation and social support on coping with stresses and health-related adversity; mindfulness techniques to reduce stress and promote wellness, theoretical models and strategies for behavior change; and ethnic disparities in health. Content will be presented through lectures, discussions, video, experimental exercise, reading and writing assignments.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring
PSY 209  Health Psychology  (3 credits)  

Health psychology demonstrates the role of psychology as a hub science. That is, psychological research and theory influence core disciplines such as medicines, mathematics and the social sciences. The impact of psychology in the health sciences is especially striking. Public health models, the study of disease, pain, stress, coping, and well-being draw extensively on psychology and psychologists. The course summarizes relevant findings in terms of treatments, health care systems, health care policy and advocacy.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Spring and Summer.
PSY 210P  Experimental Psychology II  (4 credits)  
PSY 211  Counseling for Veterans and Service Members  (3 credits)  

The course provides an introduction to the challenges veterans and service members face both socially and psychologically while exploring contemporary treatment modalities including: Cognitive Processing Theory and Prolonged Exposure. We will also address the psychosocial factors of transitioning into civilian life, stigma, co-occurring disorders, resiliency, and PTSD. Throughout the course, we will emphasize the ways in which Mental Health Counselors may advocate for veterans and service member clients and enhance overall well-being.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring
PSY 212  Sensation and Perception  (3 credits)  
PSY 214  Animal Psychology and the Human-Animal Bond  (3 credits)  

This course provides students with introductory knowledge that builds on one’s understanding of animal cognitive capacities, their emotional functioning, as well as normative and abnormal behavior. Emphasis will be placed on household pets. Students will learn about the importance of attachment theory in the context of human-animal bonds.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring
PSY 215  Psychology of Cultural Diversity  (3 credits)  

This course will give students an overview of the many issues involved in multicultural psychology. Students are required to critique, analyze, and integrate diversity issues raised in the text, class discussions, presentations, and real world to gain understanding of contemporary social issues from the psychological perspective of cultural diversity.

Course Rotation: Summer.
PSY 222  Psychology of the Exceptional Individual  (3 credits)  
PSY 224  Introduction to Clinical and Community Psychology  (3 credits)  
PSY 225  Parapsychology and the Occult  (3 credits)  

The course covers a diverse selection of occult, paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs. These include, but are not limited to: ESP and parapsychology; ghosts, near-death experiences and demonic possession; UFOs and alien abductions; astrology and ancient astronauts; The Bermuda Triangle; pseudopsychologies and psychoanalysis; faith healing; alternative medicine and health quackery; environmental pseudoscience and mass hysteria; Loch Ness Monster and cryptozoology. The course examines the evidence for the reality of these various phenomena as well as the psychology of belief.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring - Odd years.
PSY 227  Psychology of Women  (3 credits)  

The course investigates the psychological characteristics of women and possible psychological differences between the sexes attributable to biological and/or cultural factors. Current relevant movements are examined in the light of the psychological principles deduced.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.
PSY 230  Personality and Social Psychology: Readings at the Leading Edge  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the most recent important empirical research in personality and social psychology. In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about the aspects of life that are not pathological but are part of everyday human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of the most recent personality and social psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings in specific areas including happiness, loneliness, social psychological contagion, self-determination, and others; (3) examining how these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation: Fall:PLV
PSY 231  Psychology of Death and Dying  (3 credits)  

This course provides an opportunity to explore the significance of the subject of death and dying in one's life and how the beliefs and feelings related to death and dying influence one's life and living. Students are introduced to the extensive theoretical and research literature in the area of the psychology of death and dying.

Prerequisites: applies to NYC Campus only. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.
PSY 233  Psychology of Civic Engagement  (3 credits)  

This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on civic engagement will be featured.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall, Spring, Summer.
PSY 234  Human Sexual Behavior  (3 credits)  

This course examines components of human sexual behavior including anthropological, sociological and psychological aspects. Taboos, rituals and rites of primitive and modern cultures are explored to provide a framework for current attitudes and practices.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.
PSY 235  Community Psychology  (3 credits)  

Community Psychology studies action-oriented movements in psychology that deal with problems in the community. The purpose of this course is to describe and critique the basic concepts that underlie a community psychology perspective, to study the historical factors that led to the development of these concepts, and to understand the impact on the community of the interrelated personal, social, and community factors. Topics include social change, action programs, prevention, and ecology in order to examine how the community environment could be enhanced as a context for change and growth. Integration of the discipline's values, theories, and methods is stressed.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.
PSY 240  Positive Psychology and Happiness  (3 credits)  

This course will be devoted to a particular domain of research and clinical application, known as “positive psychology.” In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; (3) moving beyond what makes us happy and studying other aspects of the “good life,” such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and (4) examining whether these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.
PSY 241  Psychology of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the etiology of alcoholism and other substance abuse from a psychological perspective. The psychological, learning, and social psychological bases for these substance abuses and their implications for treatment and recovery by the addicted individual are covered.

Course Rotation: NYC: Summer. PLV: Spring.
PSY 242  Under the Radar: Seldom Talked About Addictions  (3 credits)  

In this class we will discuss several different addictions, how they affect individuals, and people who love them. We will talk about Co-dependency and Co-addiction and why people choose to be with addicted individuals.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring and Summer.
PSY 243  Applied Social Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course in an introduction to the social psychology as it is applied to a broad range of fields. Students will explore the array of applications of social psychology to a number of areas that can lead to career paths of their choice. Topics include: educational, business, consumer, health & wellness, sports, criminal justice & law, environmental , media psychologies, and diversity issues.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.
PSY 251  Non-Violent Communication  (3 credits)  

Non-Violent Communication or NVC also known as Compassionate Communication is a powerful theory and system of interpersonal communication and conflict resolution developed over the past 40years by the psychologist Marshall Rosenberg. This system has been used throughout the world, helping people in over 40 countries, to resolve the conflicts that divided them. As a system of communication, NVC requires a paradigm shift in the way people typically communicate with one another. It is one that is far more effective in helping people to connect with each other, and a result, to resolve their differences. As a theory of behavior, Nonviolent Communication, draws upon the best in client-centered, cognitive-behavioral, gestalt, existential and psychoanalytic self-psychology and is an effective system for psychological healing as well as for promoting personal growth and change. This course will introduce the basic theory and practices of this system, experientially as well as cognitively, and show how these practices can be applied in home and counseling settings.

Course Rotation: PLV, Fall
PSY 252  Altered States of Consciousness  (3 credits)  

The study of normal and altered states of human consciousness is conducted through the literature and demonstrations. Methods of inducing such states include relaxation techniques, transcendental meditation, biofeedback applications, hypnosis, sensory overload and deprivation, guided imagery, and psychopharmacology.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall - Even years.
PSY 254  Human Relations  (3 credits)  
PSY 255  Psychological Strategies of Coping  (3 credits)  
PSY 256  Psychology of Personal Adjustment  (3 credits)  

An experiential and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.
PSY 256Q  Psychology of Adjustment  (3 credits)  

This Learning Community will introduce students to a variety of holistic approaches to adjustment and health. The psychology course component will emphasize experiential and lecture study of personal adjustment. Students will participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help them understand their own adjustments to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning. The HW course component will emphasize the practice of postures, movements, deep breathing, meditation and visualization for complete mental and physical relaxation. Emphasis will be on practice of these techniques.

PSY 256Y  Psychology of Personal Adjustment (Online - Nactel)  (4 credits)  

This course presents an experimental and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

Prerequisites: Restricted to students in the A.S. Degree of the Nactel program. Students must be working towards an A.S. or B.S. degree in Telecommunications.
PSY 257  Sports Psychology  (3-4 credits)  

Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experiences in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

PSY 258  Forensic Psychology  (3 credits)  

Within the field of Psychology, Forensic Psychology has become an important focus of the criminal justice system, clinical practice of psychology as well as scientific research. Forensic Psychology deals with the application of psychological knowledge or methods to tasks faced by the legal system. Some tasks include: criminal, investigation, assessing defendant for insanity or competency, assessing people for risk of violence, sexual offense or other dangerous behaviors, trial consultation, child-custody evaluations, etc. in conclusions, it is the endeavor that examines aspects of human behavior directly related to the legal process and the professional practice of Psychology within a legal system that embraces both criminal and civil law and their interactions.

Course Rotation: PLV:Spring
PSY 260  Critical Thinking and Problem Solving  (4 credits)  

One important goal of higher education is to develop one's critical thinking and problem solving abilities. This course is designed to achieve two major goals, one academic, and the other, practical. The academic goal is to explore the psychology of human thinking and problem solving, whereas the practical goal is to help you understand the processes and styles of you own thinking, enhance your critical thinking abilities, and practice your problem solving skills needed for career and academic success. To fulfill the academic goal, the course introduces exciting research and theories in cognitive psychology related with critical thinking and problem solving, such as memory, emotion, language, reasoning, decision-making, creativity, thinking styles, as well as individual differences in various kinds of human intelligence. To accomplish the practical goal, this course brings you opportunities to examine your own thinking processes, organize and challenge your own mind, and practice your critiquing and evaluating skills to others.

PSY 270  Psychology of Rehabilitation  (3 credits)  
PSY 271  Psychology of Morality  (3 credits)  

What makes people good or bad? How do we develop a sense of right or wrong? When should people be responsible for their actions? These are but three of the many important questions being investigated in a field known as moral psychology. Researchers in moral psychology address timeless philosophical questions by examining the biological, social, and psychological nature of why and how we become moral agents. In order to understand what underlies morality today, we must first understand its evolutionary history and biological underpinnings. (As a species how did we develop morality? What brain processes underline morality?). From the biological we move to the developmental (Do babies understand morality? Is morality learned? How does morality develop over time?) To fully understand morality, we must then understand the social and psychological processes that help us make decisions about what is good and what is bad. (Why do we “feel” that certain things are right and certain things are wrong? How do we come to a make a decision about what is good and what is bad?) Finally, using what we have learned, we will investigate the issue of individual differences and circumstances related to moral behavior, and then consider how our knowledge might be applied –for better (hopefully) or worse-in the near future.

Course Rotation: NY:PLV;Spring
PSY 276  The Psychology of Intimate Relation  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the most recent empirical research in the field of personal relationships. In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about an aspect of life that is very important part of everyday human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of the most recent psychology findings in the field; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings in specific areas including marriage, happiness, and fulfillment in relationships; (3) examining how these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation: Fall;NYC:PLV
PSY 277  Evolutionary Psychology  (4 credits)  

This course examines how important aspects of human thinking, emotion, and behavior have been shaped by our long biological evolution through the processes of natural selection and sexual selection. Its focus is to identify and explain what factors are universal in human psychological functioning and their community with non-human species. Topics covered in this course include: explanations of human evolution, intelligence, thinking and problem solving in regard to social relations, mate selection, evolutionary explanations of psychological disorders such as phobia and depression, gender differences, parenting, aggression, cooperation, dominance and territoriality.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall
PSY 278  Environmental Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course examines interactions between people and the physical environment. Characteristics of physical environments have a powerful effect on human perceptions, emotions, attributions, and behavior. The major focus of the course is on environments designed and constructed by people (the “built” environment), not natural environments. Topics covered in this course include personal space, crowding, territoriality, wayfinding, good and bad environmental design and privacy.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall.
PSY 290M  Topic: Psychology of Sports  (3 credits)  
PSY 290S  Contemporary Issues in Psychology: Drug Addiction  (3 credits)  
PSY 291B  Topic: Psychological Aspects of Alcohol and Drug Abuse  (3 credits)  
PSY 291C  Topic: Psychology of Leadership Supervising and Motivating Others  (3 credits)  
PSY 291D  Topics in Psychology: Advanced Critical Thinking  (3 credits)  
PSY 291F  Topic: Team Building, Negotiation, and Customer Satisfaction  (3 credits)  
PSY 291G  Topic: Current Trends in Adolescent Development  (3 credits)  
PSY 291H  Topic: Darwin - Living in the Entangled Bank  (3 credits)  
PSY 291M  Special Topics: Negotiation and Conflict Management  (3 credits)  
PSY 291N  Topic: Scientific Blunders - Explaining Human Nature  (3 credits)  
PSY 291P  Topics: Psychology of Commitment  (3 credits)  
PSY 291Q  Topic: Evaluating Human Computer Interface Design  (3 credits)  
PSY 291S  Topics: Psychology and Law  (3 credits)  
PSY 291T  Topic: The Emotions  (3 credits)  
PSY 296A  Topic: Psychology of Ethnic Groups in the United States of America: The Latino Experience  (3 credits)  

The course will present a general overview of issues relevant for the application of psychological theory, research, and practice to Latinos as ethnic groups. This is the fastest growing minority group in the United States of America and represents diverse countries of origin. Particular attention will be given to applying psychological theories and constructs in the analysis of the experience of being Latino in the United States of America. Topics covered will include Latino culture, family patterns, immigration and acculturation, as well as poverty, prejudice, race and racism.

PSY 296B  Topic: Psychology of Peace and Conflict Resolution  (3 credits)  

Division 48 of the American Psychological Association, the Peace Psychology Division, works to promote peace in the world at large and within nations, communities and families, through research, education and training on issues concerning peace, nonviolent conflict resolution and reconciliation, and the causes and prevention of destructive conflict. Its journal, Peace and Conflict: the Journal of Peace Psychology, is published quarterly, and reflects the growing interest in this area of focus within the field of psychology. This course will devote itself to these same issues, focusing on the causes and prevention of violence, training in methods of non-violent resolution of conflict, and the practices of violence, training in methods of non-violent resolution of conflict, and the practices and institutions that promote peacemaking and peaceful development of families and nations.

PSY 296C  Topic in Psychology: Introduction to Peace Studies  (4 credits)  
PSY 296E  Topic: Psychology of Acting and Public Self-Presentation  (3 credits)  

This course will introduce you to the basics of public self-presentation as these are related to psychology and counseling. These include theory, instrument, and craft work. The course will incorporate the study of several techniques of acting in both didactic and experimental formats. The skills of listening, relating and responding and use of the emotional life will be discussed, demonstrated and related to the skills of helping people.

PSY 296F  Topic: Personality and Leadership  (3 credits)  

This course will introduce you to the field of leadership as it is manifested in such settings as business and other organizational settings. Personality factors involved in leadership behaviors will be emphasized as they are applied in various settings.

PSY 296J  Topic: Pseudoscience and Critical Thinking in Psychology and Other Fields  (3 credits)  

This course examines the distinctions between scientific psychology and pseudoscience in the popular culture. This examination will be done from the perspectives of social psychology (belief systems and persuasion); cognitive psychology (superstition magical thinking), and critical thinking in scientific psychology.

PSY 296K  Understanding a Globalized World  (3 credits)  

This two-week Summer Institute in Global Health & Psychology will provide exposure to the challenge of conducting research on physical and mental health in a globalized world. Through the lens of globalization, the course will explore the many ways in which the world has changed, created new challenges for individuals and societies, and the challenge of conducting research to help make sense of that change. The topics selected offer a broad and deep understanding of this field, specifically, an appreciation of psychology's relevance to the understanding and solution of global problems, as well as of how psychology itself is affected by worldwide events and forces.

Course Rotation: Summer
PSY 296L  Special Topics: Psychology of Stress  (3 credits)  

Stressors are an inevitable part of life, and how we respond to stressful experiences can have dramatic effects on our physical health and well-being. The topic of human stress is interdisciplinary; we will approach the scientific study of stress from many different vantage points, including psychological, biological, environmental, and medical perspectives.

Course Rotation: NY; Spring
PSY 296M  Topics: Psychology of Social Networking and Digital Media  (3 credits)  

This course involves a combination of didactic and experiential learning strategies to explore the relationship between the various platforms of digital technology and human functioning. As new technologies continue to emerge and play a dominant role in navigating daily life and relationships with others, it is crucial to better understand the role of technology and identify the new challenges and opportunities it brings. Questions emerge about the nature of self and identity in online and offline spaces; the role of technology in finding intimacy with others as well as solitude with ourselves; and how technology might be fundamentally changing the human condition, altering our minds and behavioral patterns in conscious and unconscious ways. Most importantly, this course will challenge students to incorporate the knowledge they are gaining through readings and course discussion into their own behavior own relationships to technology through experiential learning assignments and designing experiments that can be administered to their peers. Raising awareness about the impact of technology on the self is crucial due to the potential for bias in developing research projects, given the pervasive role of technology in the lives of young people. Students will thus adopt tho role of participant-observers In attempt to balance the task of observing and studying these phenomena while simultaneously being immersed In them. Given the many platforms in our society aiming to deepen our understanding of these new media, each class will involve materials taken from each of three platforms addressing the impact of technology on human functioning : (1) academic article, (2) popular news media, and (3) artistic expression of these phenomena. Class discussions will attempt to synthesize the wisdom and lessons that can be drawn from all three platforms in effort to develop a comprehensive and multi-faceted appreciation of this complex topic.

PSY 296N  Topic: Psych of Health, Well-Being, & Happiness: Biopsychosocial, Cultural & Spiritual Perspectives  (3 credits)  

This course will review contemporary research & provide experiential learning opportunities to better understand the biopsychosocial aspects of health, psychosocial well-being and happiness. The course will cover the science and practices which foster better health and living a happier and more fulfilling life. Classroom sessions will explain the origins of stress, anxiety & depression, strategies to manage negative emotional states & help to achieve psychosocial well-being.

Course Rotation: TBD
PSY 296P  Special Topics in Psychology: Performance Psychology  (3 credits)  

Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus on issues such as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experienced in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership, and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

PSY 296Z  Topic: Children and Youth - A Global Perspective  (3 credits)  

This course explores the life experiences of children and youth from a global perspective and examines the impact of their life experiences on their psychosocial development. It explores a number of global trends in child and youth development and highlights continued obstacles in a number of key areas, including: Child protection and child rights, development in high risk settings, the impact of globalization, child trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation, child soldiers and children in armed conflict, child labor, discrimination and violence against children and youth (including gender-based violence), and HIV/AIDS and other health-related issues (e.g., female genital mutilation).

PSY 297  Principles of Psychology As Depicted in Cinema  (3-4 credits)  

This course covers various topics in psychology, including existential theory, transference, psychopathology, adolescent, ethical, and diversity issues. Students are expected to read assigned articles or book chapters and discuss these issues and how they relate to the dynamics and characters in popular mainstream films that students view during the online portion of the class.

Course Rotation: NY and PL
PSY 298  Psychology of Stress  (3 credits)  

Stressors are an inevitable part of life, and how we respond to stressful experiences can have dramatic effects on our physical health and well-being. The topic of human stress is interdisciplinary; we will approach the scientific study of stress from many different vantage points, including psychological, biological environmental, and medical perspectives.

Course Rotation: NYC; Spring.
PSY 300  Special Topics in Psychology  (3 credits)  
PSY 300A  Special Topic in Psychology: The Major Experience  (1 credits)  
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing as Human Relations or Psychology Major.
PSY 300B  Special Topic in Psychology: The Major Experience  (2 credits)  
PSY 300C  Diversity Prosperity Resilience: A Psychological Perspective on the Interaction Between Mind & Body  (4 credits)  

Through a series of readings, discussion, projects, presentations, and exercises, this advanced seminar will enhance students’ understanding of the interaction between the mind, body, situations, circumstances, and society and the influence that these exert on our experience of diversity, well-being, prosperity, resilience, and disparity. Inter-and intra-individual differences (biological, psychological, and social) are shaped by, and in turn, shape cultural diversity. The course will enhance students' understanding of individual and cultural diversity, locally and globally. Cultural diversity, or indeed any kind of diversity within a group of people, inevitably contributes to demarcating identifiable versus non-­ identifiable traits and preferred versus non-preferred characteristics; eventually these preferences and identifications contribute to disparities.

Course Rotation: Fall
PSY 300D  Diversity Prosperity Resilience: A Psychological Perspective on the Interaction Between Mind & Body  (4 credits)  

Through a series of readings, discussion, projects, presentations, and exercises, this advanced seminar will enhance students' understanding of the interaction between the mind, body, situations, circumstances, and society and the influence that these exert on our experience of diversity, well-being, prosperity, resilience, and disparity. Inter-and intra-­ individual differences (biological, psychological, and social) are shaped by, and in turn, shape cultural diversity. The course will enhance students' understanding of individual and cultural diversity, locally and globally. Cultural diversity or indeed any kind of diversity Within a group of people, inevitably contributes to demarcating identifiable versus non­Identifiable traits and preferred versus non-preferred characteristics; eventually these preferences and identifications contribute to disparities.

Course Rotation: Spring.
PSY 302  Child Psychology  (3 credits)  

A study of the psychology of the developing child from birth through adolescence. At each developmental stage the child will be considered from physical, cognitive and psychosocial perspectives, and from diverse theoretical viewpoints.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Fall and Spring.
PSY 303  Adolescent Psychology  (3 credits)  

A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the individual from puberty to maturity plus an examination of the problems of adolescence as viewed by the adolescent, the parent, the psychologist, and the teacher.

Course Rotation: PLV: Summer.
PSY 304  Social Psychology  (4 credits)  

A presentation of the theories and empirical research on the characteristics of group behavior, factors influencing it, and the individual's reaction to social stimuli. Topics included are group structure, group dynamics, values, attitudes, public opinion research, communication, propaganda, prejudice, roles, and leadership.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.
PSY 306  Psychological Testing  (4 credits)  

Introduction to test and measurement theory. Discussion of the criteria to be used in the selection of psychological tests as well as theoretical conceptions of reliability, validity and operations for estimating from empirical data different kinds of reliability and validity. Frequently used tests of personality, aptitudes and achievement are considered.

Course Rotation: Fall.
PSY 307  Psychology of Personality  (3 credits)  

An introduction to the scientific study of personality development with emphasis on the normal. Examines the nature of personality theory, methods of assessment and research, and the major theories representative of the following orientations: type-trait, psychodynamic, phenomenological, cognitive, and learning.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.
PSY 308  History of Psychology  (4 credits)  

This course traces the development of psychology from its philosophical roots to the present. The competition of ideas among the major systems of psychology provides a basis for a critical evaluation of psychology in the 21st Century.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.
PSY 311  Biological Psychology  (4 credits)  

A study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior. The course covers the physiological background of the organism, sensory and motor functions, and physiological factors at work in motivation, learning, memory, and psychological disorders.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring. PLV: Fall.
PSY 311P  Physiological Psychology  (3 credits)  

This Learning Community provides a balance of biological and behavioral aspects of human sexuality using a multidisciplinary approach. Anatomical and physiological correlates, STDs and the human immune defense system, and pregnancy/conception/developmental issues will be highlighted. Goals of the Learning Community include familiarizing students with major findings and theoretical perspectives, and to understand how these ideas can be applied in order to understand a variety of social situations.

PSY 313  Research Methodology  (4 credits)  

A survey course designed to introduce basic strategies in psychological research. It aims to acquaint the student with library skills, research instruments, methods, and designs with their statistical correlates.

Course Rotation: Spring.
PSY 314  Psychology of Creative Thinking  (3 credits)  

This course will examine various theories of creativity, conscious versus unconscious aspects of creative thinking, methods for studying creativity, and the development of thinking in several individuals generally recognized as highly creative thinkers, including Darwin, Picasso, and Einstein. Special topics such as child prodigies and "idiot savants" will also be considered.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.
PSY 315  Cognitive Psychology  (4 credits)  

The course is an introduction to human cognitive processes and the key concepts and findings in cognitive psychology. The relevance of cognitive processes to everyday experiences; effective learning strategies; and applications to other disciplines, such as education, communication and speech, law, clinical, and consumer psychology are covered. This course is based on assumptions that are supported by research.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring.
PSY 317  Problem Solving & Critical Thinking In Psychology  (3 credits)  

This course provides an analysis of the various component skills of critical thinking, skills such as problem solving, decision making, logic, understanding probability, and memory enhancement techniques. The nature of intelligence and the possibility of improving it will also be considered.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall.
PSY 318  Psychological Bases for Critical Thinking  (3 credits)  

Introduces basic principles of perceiving, evaluating, making decisions and taking action. High levels of interaction, hands-on practice and application produce insight into topics including increasing awareness, choosing ways of knowing, predicting consequences, and understanding observer bias, relationships and levels of abstraction.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.
PSY 319  Psychology of Adult Development  (3 credits)  

A study of mature adults and of aging processes in the absence of disease. Special attention is given to age-related changes in self-concept, and to emotional, social, and personality changes related to aging.

PSY 320  Abnormal Psychology I  (3 credits)  

A survey of origins, treatment, and descriptive characteristics of abnormal behavior with emphasis upon current research data and theories about the causes of psychopathology.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.
PSY 321  Abnormal Psychology II  (3 credits)  

A survey of the organic syndromes and the personality disorders, with particular attention to the deviations peculiar to our time such as manifestations of the drug sub-culture. Emphasis will be given to recent research findings.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Spring - Even years.
PSY 323  Psychology of Learning  (4 credits)  

This course examines the theories that were the basis of Behaviorism, classical conditional and operant conditioning. In addition, this course also analyzes cognitive theories of learning, observational learning and the evolution of the learning mechanism.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring.
PSY 323Y  Psychology of Learning  (4 credits)  
PSY 327  Mentored Lab Class Semester 1  (3 credits)  

This course will consist of an individualized, mentored research experience with a faculty member in psychology. Students will be involved in the "in lab" practical realities of conducting research studies in psychology, attend a weekly lab meeting with their paired faculty member and other research assistants, and throughout the semester meet with other faculty members to learn about the depth and breadth of psychological research and discuss topics, methodologies and techniques in psychological science. Requires sophomore standing, completion of PSY112 and one 300-level course, and permission of the instructor.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.
PSY 328  Mentored Lab Class Semester 2  (3 credits)  

This course will consist of an individualized, mentored research experience with a faculty member in psychology. Students will be involved in the "in lab" practical realities of conducting research studies in psychology, attend a weekly lab meeting with their paired faculty member and other research assistants, and throughout the semester meet with other faculty members to learn about the depth and breadth of psychological research and discuss topics, methodologies and techniques in psychological science. Requires sophomore standing, completion of PSY112 and one 300-level course, and permission of the instructor.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.
PSY 332  Group Relations and Interviewing Techniques  (4 credits)  

This course covers general principles of effective interviewing. It provides students with the skills and the techniques for achieving various interview goals, with an emphasis on counseling interviews. The establishment of helping relationships in group settings is highlighted throughout.

Course Rotation: NY:PLV;Fall:Spring
PSY 337  Introduction to Psychological Counseling  (4 credits)  

Techniques and procedures are covered to develop skills applicable to a variety of settings. An experimental approach is used to prepare students to conduct interviews and counsel in personnel placement, hospital intake, educational advisement and other settings.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.
PSY 375  Lifespan Development Psychology  (4 credits)  

The development of the individual is an exciting process, beginning with the rapid metamorphoses of cells at the conception and continuing through intricate changes of growth and aging. The study of development is also intriguing because each of us, and everyone we care about, is constantly developing. This course therefore embraces both scientific discoveries and personal insights. It is important to remember that each of us analyzing the developing individual is only human, and thus our interpretation of behavior and change is filtered through our own biases. So that you may identify biases where they occur, we will spend time becoming familiar with the major theories of human development and the terms these theories use, paying special attention to the research that supports or contradicts each perspective. Critical thinking, as well as mastery of the material, is a goal of this course. Probably no other field of study abounds with more free advice than child rearing, yet much of this advice has been handed out in ignorance of the available experimental data and/or established techniques for objective testing. We will work to develop skills for evaluating the views and advice you will continue to hear long after you close your books.

Course Rotation: NYC:PLV;FALL
PSY 380  Experimental Psychology I  (4 credits)  

The year-long course sequence prepares students to critically evaluate empirical research in psychology and to design, conduct, and present original research projects. Course topics cover literature reviews, development of testable hypotheses, research design concepts, statistical procedures relevant to behavioral research, data collection techniques, interpretation and evaluation of research findings, and ethical issues in research. The research topics may be in diverse areas such as learning, cognitive processes, and social and organizational behavior. The original research proposals are developed in PSY 380; the original research projects are conducted and presented in PSY 381. Written scientific reports and the opportunity to present the original research at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference culminate the course sequence.

Course Rotation: Fall.
PSY 381  Experimental Psychology II  (4 credits)  

The year-long course sequence prepares students to critically evaluate empirical research in psychology and to design, conduct, and present original research projects. Course topics cover literature reviews, development of testable hypotheses, research design concepts, statistical procedures relevant to behavioral research, data collection techniques, interpretation and evaluation of research findings, and ethical issues in research. The research topics may be in diverse areas such as learning, cognitive processes, and social and organizational behavior. The original research proposals are developed in PSY 380; the original research projects are conducted and presented in PSY 381. Written scientific reports and the opportunity to present the original research at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference culminate the course sequence.

Course Rotation: Spring.
PSY 382  Experimental Psychology and Quantitative Methods  (5 credits)  

Design and analysis of various types of experiments, including simple two group, multivariate, non-parametric, latin square, and covariance designs. Although basic current theory and research in learning, perception and social psychology are presented, emphasis is on original research.

PSY 390  Honors Project in Psychology  (3-6 credits)  
PSY 391  Practicum in Psychology I  (4 credits)  

A field training experience involving a minimum of 120 supervised hours in an accredited agency. Evaluations are made of student performance by supervising personnel of the agency and by faculty supervisors. Students must contact the fieldwork coordinator prior to the semester of actual placement.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.
PSY 392  Practicum in Psychology II  (4 credits)  

In the weekly seminar and 120 additional supervised hours in an accredited agency, the student continues the process begun in PSY 391 in expanding helping skills and understanding of the field.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.
PSY 393  Internship in Psychology  (1-4 credits)  

An internship is an assignment, paid or volunteer, in settings such as human service agencies, businesses, industries or organizations that is intended to provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge of psychological principals and empirical research. The intern’s duties and responsibilities will be tailored to the needs of the sponsoring organization and the background of the student. The internship site must be approved by the psychology department in advance of the work experience. Internships are either full-time or part-time and generally last for one semester. The internship may be taken once (one semester).

Course Rotation: NY,PLV; Fall,Spring
PSY 395  Independent Study in Psychology  (1-9 credits)  

With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the department chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: TBA.
PSY 395A  Independent Study in Psychology (A)  (1-9 credits)  
PSY 395B  Independent Study in Psychology (B)  (1-9 credits)  
PSY 395C  Independent Study in Psychology (C)  (1-9 credits)  
PSY 396  Special Topics in Psychology  (3 credits)  

In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics in depth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples. May be taken more than once for credit.

Course Rotation: TBA.
PSY 396A  Topic: Psychology of Leadership, Supervising, Motivating  (3 credits)  

It has long been realized that people don’t quit jobs, they quit Bosses. People will not follow a bad manager, supervisor or leader under most conditions other than coercion.The basic premise of this course is that it is the personality of an individual and his ability to inspire trust and credibility that makes the difference in the performance of organizations (teams, groups). No matter what the system of management is or the system of governance, it is the nature and strength of the leader that makes all the difference, in what people will do to accomplish mutual goals. All Presidents of the United States operate under a free Democracy. But, is it the same government under an Obama, Bush, Clinton, Johnson or Nixon? While there are similarities attributable to the system and the times, there are also major differences which are a function of the personality of the Leader. Indeed, we often pick partners and professors on the basis of likeability, trustworthiness and credibility as opposed only to objective qualifications.

PSY 396B  Topic: Managing in the New World of Work  (3 credits)  
PSY 396C  Topic: Human Nature - The View from Science  (3 credits)  
PSY 396D  Topic: The Psychology of Communicating  (3 credits)  
PSY 396E  Topic: Current Research in Child Development  (3 credits)  
PSY 396F  Topic: Current Issues in Industrial / Organizational Psychology  (3 credits)  
PSY 396G  Topic: Psychology of Influence  (3 credits)  
PSY 396H  Topic: Psychopathology Goes to Movies  (3 credits)  

The intended purpose of this course is to teach through Films, how the various psychopathologies might play themselves out in an approximation of real-life, real world situations of which these films are a simulacrum. John Milton, in Paradise Lost tells us that we must “strike the visual nerve, for we have much to see”. So, too, in this course there is much to learn by seeing with the mind’s eye through well-chosen films the Psychopathology set forth in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association.

PSY 396I  Topic: Relationship Skills for Partners and Parents  (3 credits)  

This course will help you identify and develop the interpersonal skills necessary for successful, happy relationships. In particular, the course will focus on dating/marriage and parenting. You will learn how to build and maintain healthy relationships. Interpersonal communication skills to improve your ability to listen, express feelings, encourage, give and receive feedback, state needs, and resolve conflicts will be taught and practiced. The class will use didactic presentations, source readings, group interaction, popular movies, and, role-plays. Typical conflicts that arise in relationships and parenting will be addressed with practical, realistic approaches to problem solving.

PSY 396L  Topic: Childhood: A Work in Progress  (3 credits)  
PSY 396M  Topic: Comprehensive Review of Psychology  (3 credits)  
PSY 396O  Mentored Lab Class  (3 credits)  

This course will consist of an individualized, mentored research experience with a faculty member in psychology. Students will be involved in the “in lab” practical realities of conducting research studies in psychology, attend a weekly lab meeting with their paired faculty member and other research assistants, and throughout the semester meet with other faculty members to learn about the depth and breath of psychological research and discuss topics, methodologies and techniques in psychological science.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.
PSY 396P  Topic: Psychology of Music  (3 credits)  
PSY 396Q  Topic: Computer Applications in Psychology and Human Relations  (3 credits)  
PSY 396R  Topic: Psychology of Civic Engagements  (3 credits)  

This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on physic engagement will be featured.

PSY 396S  Topic: Psychology of the Individual Officer  (3 credits)  

In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics indepth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples.

PSY 396T  Topic: Child Psychopathology  (3 credits)  

In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics indepth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples.

PSY 396U  Topic: Cognitive Neuroscience  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the neurological bases of higher cognitive functions. Included will be memory, attention, perception, learning and emotion. These topics will be approached from the perspectives of the study of brain damaged humans, functional neuroimaging and, where relevant, research on animals.

PSY 396V  Topic in Applied Psychology: Psychology in Context  (3 credits)  
PSY 396W  Psychological Aspects of Business Management Development  (3 credits)  

This course will offer the student the opportunity to play a critical personal role in the development and enhancement of a successful career-life program. This course will encourage the student to apply sound psychological principles to one's career choice: to discover, in depth, one's authentic personality and express that construct in the career choice following the Pace experience.

PSY 396X  Topic: Business Management Development: Formulating a Dynamic Career Life  (3 credits)  
PSY 396Y  Topic: Positive Psychology and Happiness  (3 credits)  

This course focuses on what psychologists have learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. Topics addressed include: identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; examining theoretical perspectives and empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; aspects of the "good life" such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and the application of these theories and findings to everyday life.

PSY 396Z  Topic: Sports Psychology  (3-4 credits)  

Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus on issues such as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experienced in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership, and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

PSY 397A  Topic: Overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Theory, Intervention, and Observational Research  (3 credits)  
PSY 397B  Exploring Psychological Issues after Trauma  (3 credits)  

This course provides an introduction to how people respond and cope after a traumatic experience by the course of meaning-making. The class will explore the meaning-making model, while also looking at meaning-centered psychotherapy. We will explore current psychological issues related to different populations including but not limited to cancer survivors, bereavement, sexual abuse survivors, and veterans. This course will use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case studies, role-play and demonstration of counselling skills.

PSY 499  Senior Year Experience in Human Relations and Psychology  (3 credits)  

The content of this seminar will be a theme or problem selected by the students and faculty, who will organize into subgroups to do research on varying aspects of the theme or problem. Weekly seminars will involve ongoing discussions and development of the topic. Each team will prepare and present papers for discussion in the seminar and will contribute toward the writing of a final comprehensive report. A panel at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference will include team presentations.

Course Rotation: TBA.