Physician Assistant-PLV (PASP)

PASP 601  Introduction to Interprofessional Education for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This course is designed to explore the principles of interprofessional communication and collaboration within various health care disciplines. Students will learn about the importance of patient-centered health care teams in providing high quality, cost-effective patient care. The roles and responsibilities of various health care providers will be discussed as well as the skills necessary to become a valued team member who can communicate and collaborate effectively. Communication skills, intrapersonal skills, and the ability to create therapeutic relationships will be emphasized.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 603  Clinical Anatomy and Physiology with lab for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

This course presents an integrative approach to the study of the human anatomy and physiology. The focus of the course is on understanding the relationship between the structures and functions of the human body and the mechanisms utilized in maintaining homeostasis. All major organ systems will be covered with specific emphasis on clinical relevance. This course will include a laboratory component that parallels and reinforces lecture concepts by using a variety of hands-on models, materials and demonstrations.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 606  Clinical Anatomy and Physiology with Cadaver Lab for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This course is designed to reinforce and enhance the student’s knowledge of human anatomy learned in Clinical Anatomy and Pathophysiology. An integrated laboratory course in gross anatomy designed to provide an understanding of the functional and structural anatomy of the human body essential to the practicing Physician Assistant. The laboratory component of the course entails a full cadaver lab experience, with virtual enhancement computer programs to augment the cadaver dissections. Pro-Section modalities will be utilized as necessary to enhance the educational experience. There will also be a hands-on cadaver dissection experience. Additional virtual dissections; utilizing VH virtual dissector on the computer will be utilized as homework and as a study guide outside of the actual lab experience. The virtual labs will connect anatomical and physiological detail with clinical practice, focusing on the gross anatomy of the human, utilizing virtual cadaver dissection. When appropriate as time permits clinical problems are reviewed to highlight the importance of anatomy as it pertains to clinical practice.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 609  Physical Assessment 1 for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course is the first of two classes that are focused on developing competency in taking a medical history, performing a physical exam, documenting findings, and recognizing history and exam findings that signify problems or diseases. This includes learning and practicing communication skills that include empathy and sensitivity with diverse populations and the key elements of developing therapeutic relationships with patients. Students are taught how to perform complete and focused histories and physical exams as they relate to specific body systems and patient complaints - and they practice these skills in the hands-on laboratory component of the course.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 611  Clinical Medicine 1 for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This is the first in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including disease epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, progression and prognosis. Evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventative measures employed in the management of these disease states will be addressed.Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices, and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient's clinical presentation.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 614  Clinical Correlation 1 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the first in a series of courses designed to provide a collaborative learning space for students to begin to develop, integrate and refine their clinical skills – the essential skills required to professionally care for a patient in a basic medical encounter. An emphasis is placed on learning and adopting a patient-centered approach to care that includes building therapeutic relationships with patients, effective communication with patients, families and colleagues and the development and practice of clinical reasoning skills. This course uses clinical case studies and hands-on experiences that are designed to offer students the opportunity to learn and practice their clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 617  Medical Pharmacology 1 for Physician Assistants  (2 credits)  

This is the first in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, both prescription and non-prescription. The course will include the principle mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents (to parallel the diseases being covered in Clinical Medicine), pharmacodynamics, uses side effects and toxicities. An emphasis in this first course of the series will be placed on the role of pharmacists on the interprofessional team, how drug receptors work and the significance of black box warnings.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 620  Pathophysiology 1 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the first in a series of courses designed to present an orientation to diseases as disordered physiology. It will cover the pathophysiology of common disease conditions affecting humans using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics. The focus will be on learning and analyzing the mechanisms of disease to better understand the cause and significance of clinical manifestations as well as how to choose effective preventative and therapeutic interventions. Within the series, course content will move from basic pathological processes of disease by organ or organ system to multiple system diseases and associated processes.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 623  Physical Assessment 2 for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course is the second of two classes that are focused on developing competency in taking a medical history, performing a physical exam, documenting findings, and recognizing history and exam findings that signify problems or diseases. This includes learning and practicing communication skills that include empathy and sensitivity with diverse populations and the key elements of developing therapeutic relationships with patients. Students are taught how to perform complete and focused histories and physical exams as they relate to specific body systems and patient complaints - and they practice these skills in the hands-on laboratory component of the course. In addition to learning how to examine the remaining body systems, students also learn how to perform histories and examinations on infants, children, adolescents, geriatrics and pregnant women. At the end of the course, students summarize and integrate their learning by demonstrating the ability to perform a head to toe exam with a standardized patient.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 626  Clinical Medicine 2 for Physician Assustants  (3 credits)  

This is the second in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including disease epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, progression and prognosis. Evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventative measures employed in the management of these disease states will be addressed. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices, and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient's clinical presentation.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 629  Clinical Correlation 2 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the second in a series of courses designed to provide a collaborative learning space for students to begin to develop, integrate and refine their clinical skills – the essential skills required to professionally care for a patient in a basic medical encounter. An emphasis is placed on learning and adopting a patient-centered approach to care that includes building therapeutic relationships with patients, effective communication with patients, families and colleagues and the development and practice of clinical reasoning skills. This course uses clinical case studies and hands-on experiences that are designed to offer students the opportunity to learn and practice their clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 631  Medical Pharmacology 2 for Physician Assistants  (2 credits)  

This is the second in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, both prescription and non-prescription. The course will include the principle mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents (to parallel the diseases being covered in Clinical Medicine), pharmacodynamics, uses side effects and toxicities. An emphasis in this second course of the series will be placed on the purpose and use of drug schedules, opioid agonists and antagonists, commonly used drugs of abuse and toxicology emergencies.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 634  Pathophysiology 2 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the second in a series of courses designed to present an orientation to diseases as disordered physiology. It will cover the pathophysiology of common disease conditions affecting humans using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics. The focus will be on learning and analyzing the mechanisms of disease to better understand the cause and significance of clinical manifestations as well as well as how to choose effective preventative and therapeutic interventions. Within the series, course content will move from basic pathological processes of disease by organ or organ system to multiple system diseases and associated processes.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 637  Surgery for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course is designed as an overview of basic surgical concepts, including the appropriate evaluation, diagnosis, pre-operative, intraoperative and post-operative management of surgical patients. Topics will include sterile fields and technique, basic surgical instruments, operating room protocol, anesthesiology, burn treatment, trauma management, wound healing and concepts of nutrition and fluid maintenance. Students will learn about common surgical procedures, including their descriptions, indications, contraindications and complications.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 640  Healthcare Policy, Law, Ethics and Professionalism for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course introduces the concepts and basis of health care policy, the creating and implementation of health care law and the fundamentals of medical ethics, including autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. In addition, this course will cover the importance of professional ethics and professionalism and the ways this is monitored and managed. The course will also include the historical development of the physician assistant profession and how to obtain and maintain state licensure and board certification. Class discussions will include the ethical, philosophical and social dilemmas in health care and the role of culture, religion and the law in clinical practice.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring
PASP 643  Clinical Medicine 3 for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This is the third in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including disease epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, progression and prognosis. Evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventative measures employed in the management of these disease states will be addressed. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices, and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient's clinical presentation.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 646  Clinical Correlation 3 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the third in a series of courses designed to provide a collaborative learning space for students to begin to develop, integrate and refine their clinical skills – the essential skills required to professionally care for a patient in a basic medical encounter. An emphasis is placed on learning and adopting a patient-centered approach to care that includes building therapeutic relationships with patients, effective communication with patients, families and colleagues and the development and practice of clinical reasoning skills. This course uses clinical case studies and hands-on experiences that are designed to offer students the opportunity to learn and practice their clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 649  Medical Pharmacology 3 for Physician Assistants  (2 credits)  

This is the third in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, both prescription and non-prescription. The course will include the principle mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents (to parallel the diseases being covered in Clinical Medicine), pharmacodynamics, uses side effects and toxicities. An emphasis in this third course of the series will be placed on antibiotic medications and mechanism of action as well as the special considerations of the use of pharmacologic therapies in pregnant women, infants, children and adolescents.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 652  Pathophysiology 3 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the third in a series of courses designed to present an orientation to diseases as disordered physiology. It will cover the pathophysiology of common disease conditions affecting humans using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics. The focus will be on learning and analyzing the mechanisms of disease to better understand the cause and significance of clinical manifestations as well as well as how to choose effective preventative and therapeutic interventions. Within the series, course content will move from basic pathological processes of disease by organ or organ system to multiple system diseases and associated processes.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 655  Medicine in Medically Underserved Areas and the Healthcare Needs of Special Populations for PAS  (2 credits)  

This course focuses on providing competent, culturally relevant primary care in medically underserved areas. It also focuses on providing quality and cost-effective care for populations with special needs, including but not limited to, physically, emotionally or intellectually challenged patients, immigrants, HIV/AIDS patients, transgender patients, veterans and patients who are incarcerated. Students will develop and understanding of social determinants of health, health care disparities and implicit bias and the ways they impact health care delivery and outcomes. In addition, the course will discuss the role of communities in providing resources for underserved patients and the importance of patient advocacy.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 658  Radiology and Diagnostic Modalities for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course provides a broad overview of the most commonly used diagnostic tests and procedures that are used in primary care settings. This includes basic radiographs, angiography, CT scans, tomography, MRI, ultrasound, FAST, PET and nuclear medicine imaging. Indications, contraindications and uses, as well as the key components of patient education and informed consent, for each modality will be discussed. Risk vs. benefit analysis, as well as cost-effectiveness, will also be discussed in relation to the medical decision making required to choose the best testing modality given the patient's individual situation.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 661  Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Genetics and Immunology for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course provides a broad overview of microbiology, genetics and immunology as they pertain to the diagnosis, treatment and management of diseases. A focus is placed on understanding laboratory tests - their indications, contraindications and purposes - as well as key components of patient education and informed consent. The significance of normal and abnormal results will be discussed as well as the importance of choosing appropriate, cost-effective tests that will impact and guide medical decision making.

Course Rotation: PLV; Summer
PASP 664  Clinical Medicine 4 for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This is the fourth and final in a series of courses designed to provide an intensive study of human diseases and disorders, using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics, in the areas of clinical medicine including disease epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, progression and prognosis. Evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventative measures employed in the management of these disease states will be addressed. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices, and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient's clinical presentation.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall and Summer
PASP 667  Clinical Correlation 4 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the fourth and final in a series of courses designed to provide a collaborative learning space for students to begin to develop, integrate and refine their clinical skills – the essential skills required to professionally care for a patient in a basic medical encounter. An emphasis is placed on learning and adopting a patient-centered approach to care that includes building therapeutic relationships with patients, effective communication with patients, families and colleagues and the development and practice of clinical reasoning skills. This course uses clinical case studies and hands-on experiences that are designed to offer students the opportunity to learn and practice their clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 670  Medical Pharmacology 4 for Physician Assistants  (2 credits)  

This is the fourth and final in a series of courses designed to develop skills related to the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to therapeutic agents, both prescription and non-prescription. The course will include the principle mechanisms of action of the major classes of therapeutic agents (to parallel the diseases being covered in Clinical Medicine), pharmacodynamics, uses side effects and toxicities. An emphasis in this fourth course of the series will be placed on the uses and toxicities of over the counter supplements, herbs and medications as well as the special considerations of using pharmacologic therapies in geriatric patients.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall and Summer
PASP 673  Pathophysiology 4 for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This is the fourth and final in a series of courses designed to present an orientation to diseases as disordered physiology. It will cover the pathophysiology of common disease conditions affecting humans using a lifespan approach from pediatrics to geriatrics. The focus will be on learning and analyzing the mechanisms of disease to better understand the cause and significance of clinical manifestations as well as well as how to choose effective preventative and therapeutic interventions. Within the series, course content will move from basic pathological processes of disease by organ or organ system to multiple system diseases and associated processes.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 676  Technical Skills and Diagnostic Procedures for Physician Assistants  (2 credits)  

This course provides students with instruction and hands-on experience in basic clinical and technical skills, including procedures that are commonly used in primary care situations. This will include the procedure itself, indications, contraindications and potential complications for a variety of procedures as well as the key components of informed consent, patient education and follow up. Procedures covered include, but are not limited to, injections, IV insertion, suturing and urinary catheterization.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall and Summer
PASP 679  Behavioral Medicine, Human Sexuality and Counseling for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course focuses on two important components of patient care: provider communication and counseling skills and behavioral/psychiatric disorders in patients. This includes normal and abnormal development from infants to elderly patients and the impact of stress, illness, injury, death, dying and loss on the mental and physical well-being of patients. The recognition, diagnosis and treatment of substance misuse disorders will be discussed as well as violence identification and prevention strategies - along with the legal reporting responsibilities of a physician assistant within the realm of mental health and violence issues.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 682  Epidemiology, Medical Research and Biostatistics & Evidence-based Medicine for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course introduces basic epidemiology concepts, including public health, the distribution, patterns and determinants of health and disease, disease prevention, surveillance, reporting and intervention and the maintenance of population health. It also introduces basic research and biostatistical concepts, including research methods, study types and designs, sampling methods, data collection and statistical analysis. An emphasis is placed on learning ow to search, interpret and evaluate medical literature. This class will also discuss the ethical considerations and limits of medical research, including the Belmont Report Standards and the role and importance of Institutional Review Board Protocol.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 690  Independent Study in Physician Assistant Studies  (1-4 credits)  

This course is developed as an independent study course for which the student will research the medical ethics and professionalism literature to develop a deeper understanding of ethical and professional behaviors, coping skills and strategies to manage difficult situations in professional practice. The student meets regularly with the faculty member (project advisor) to review progress and discuss salient journal articles on medical ethics and professionalism. A formal AMA formatted manuscript, including bibliography will be submitted.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 691  Orientation to Clinical Year for Physician Assistants  (1 credits)  

This PASS/FAIL seminar course will include lecture and examination components. The lecture components will provide students an experience to orient themselves to the clinical year and will include: an overview of clinical sites, roles and responsibilities of both the clinical preceptor and the student, required documentation, assessments and review of applicable policies and procedure. Summative examinations will be administered during this seminar to assess medical knowledge base and skill sets prior to entering the clinical year. This is a PASS/FAIL seminar. A PASS is required for the student to progress into the clinical year.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall
PASP 705  Clinical Education Seminar for Physician Assistants  (3 credits)  

This course is designed to assist the PA student to be successful in clinical clerkships and transition into common professional workplace environments. This course is presented in a seminar style that will also include self-directed learning modules. Topics will include inter-professional education (communication and PA healthcare team relations); reimbursement, billing and coding; electronic medical record, information technology for patient/health education and preventive care; systems-based practice; insurance systems and prior authorization; patient safety and quality improvement, include preparing for employment (licensing, credentialing and finding employment); workplace stress and provider burnout; medico- legal and risk management; and current issues, professional and current events in medicine and trends facing the PA Profession. In addition to scheduled topics, students will be responsible for reviewing assigned topic related readings, researching topic related items and/or presenting case or topic related materials.

Course Rotation: PLV; Spring.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 710  Clinical Clerkship: PC/Family Med  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of a facility’s Primary Care-Family Medicine healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, attending physicians, supporting medical staff and physician assistants. The Primary Care-Family Medicine clinical clerkship will provide the student with practical clinical exposure to primary care patients, including common medical conditions, diagnostic procedures, treatments and technologies common to the Primary Care-Family Medicine healthcare environment. Preceptors will guide student learning activities to assist them in achieving course goals, learning outcomes and objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will enhance the learning experience of this course and complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV;Fall, Spring, and Summer I and II.
PASP 715  Clinical Clerkship - Pediatrics for Physician Assisants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s pediatric healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to pediatric patients, including common medical conditions, diagnostic procedures, treatments, and technologies common for the healthcare environment specific to the pediatrics specialty. The student will be exposed to not only the ill child, but also to the well child development and growth within the family unit and in peer interactions. Student will be provided an education module regarding the management of patients with end of life conditions, addressing issues and concerns of patients, family and the multidisciplinary team involved in the palliative care planning and care of the terminally ill patient. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall, Spring, Summer I and II.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 720  Clinical Clerkship - Women's Health  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s women’s healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical and participate in the care of a variety of patients with obstetric or gynecological complaints. The student will become proficient in accurate assessment of the obstetric patient with emphasis on pre- and post- natal care. The student will also become involved with the practice of "preventive" obstetrics and gynecology as well as common gynecologic disorders. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities. All clerkships are offered in every term

PASP 725  Clinical Clerkship: General Surgery for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s general surgery healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is teach the student to perform a through rapid and methodical assessment, evaluate acutely ill and potentially surgical patients. The student will work as a member of the medical team providing immediate pre- and post-op care as well as gaining hands-on experience in the operating room setting, including the common diagnostic procedures, treatments and technologies common for the general surgery specialty. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall/Spring/Summer.
PASP 730  Clinical Clerkship-Internal Medicine for Physician Assistant  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s in-patient internal medicine healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to primary care patients, including common medical conditions, diagnostic procedures, treatments and technologies that are common for the healthcare environment specific to the internal medicine specialty. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 735  Clinical Clerkship - Behavioral Health for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the behavioral health team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants or other credentialed providers for the specialty. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to patients, including common behavioral health conditions, diagnostic procedures, interviewing and counseling techniques and treatments and technologies that are common for the behavioral health specialty addressing patients across the life span. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer I and II.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 740  Clinical Clerkship - Emergency Medicine for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s pediatric healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to pediatric patients, including common medical conditions, diagnostic procedures, treatments, and technologies common for the healthcare environment specific to the pediatrics specialty. The student will be exposed to not only the ill child, but also to the well child development and growth within the family unit and in peer interactions. Student will be provided an education module regarding the management of patients with end of life conditions, addressing issues and concerns of patients, family and the multidisciplinary team involved in the palliative care planning and care of the terminally ill patient. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall, Spring, Summer I and II.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 745  Clinical Clerkship: Geriatrics for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the geriatric healthcare team at An acute care hospital / skilled nursing facility and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to geriatric patients, including common medical conditions, the diagnostic procedures, treatments and technologies that are common for the healthcare environment specific to the geriatrics specialty. Additionally, the student will be exposed to a hospice healthcare team/home hospice team to provide the student with clinical exposure to patients with end of life conditions, associated issues and concerns of patients, family and the multidisciplinary team involved in the palliative care planning and care of the terminally ill patient. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall/Spring/Summer.
PASP 750  Clinical Clerkship - Elective for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

During this five week clinical clerkship the student will be exposed to and actively participate as a member of the facility’s pediatric healthcare team and function under the direct supervision of the assigned clinical preceptor, supervision of attending physicians, house staff and physician assistants. The goal of clinical clerkship is to provide the student with practical clinical exposure to pediatric patients, including common medical conditions, diagnostic procedures, treatments, and technologies common for the healthcare environment specific to the pediatrics specialty. The student will be exposed to not only the ill child, but also to the well child development and growth within the family unit and in peer interactions. Student will be provided an education module regarding the management of patients with end of life conditions, addressing issues and concerns of patients, family and the multidisciplinary team involved in the palliative care planning and care of the terminally ill patient. Preceptors will guide the students learning activities to assist them in achieving the course learning objectives. It is likely that not all clinical conditions required for the mastery of this content area will be encountered during the clerkship. Student self-directed learning activities and clinical clerkship support materials will complement the preceptor directed activities.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall, Spring, Summer I and II.
Prerequisites: Successful passage of all didactic phase coursework.
PASP 755  Orientation to Clinical Practice Seminar: CAPSTONE for Physician Assistants  (4 credits)  

This PASS/FAIL seminar course will provide students with an orientation to clinical practice including preparation for the National Commission of the Certification of Physician Assistants examination and information requirements for licensure. Formative examinations will be administered to assess medical knowledge base and skill sets acquired prior graduation and entering the clinical practice of medicine. Although the MSPASP is a non-thesis Master degree it is expected that the student will research and write a final paper that will be thoroughly researched. The final project will include writing a clinical review article suitable for publication in JAAPA or similar publication.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall.